Margaret Cowee


N/A

Food Systems Analyst
Department of Economics
University of Nevada/Mail Stop 204
1664 N. Virginia Street
Reno,  Nevada   89557

Office: (775) 784-8050
Fax: 784-1342

Email: margaretc@unr.edu
Building: Ansari Business,  Office 520

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EDUCATION
B.S. Agricultural & Applied Economics, University of Nevada, Reno, 2003.
M.S. Resource Economics, University of Nevada, Reno, 2005

REPRESENTATIVE PUBLICATIONS

Fact Sheets
Nevada Farmers Market Customer Profiles
Between 1994 and 2008, the number of farmers markets in the U.S. increased by nearly 168 percent, from 1,755 markets to 4,685 (USDA-AMS, 2008). This shows the importance of farmers markets as a direct marketing outlet for agricultural producers.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Gatzke, H. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Why Customers Shop at Farmers Markets in Nevada
Farmers markets are an increasingly popular alternative to traditional grocery stores for consumers. In the decade between 1998 and 2008, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (USDA- AMS) estimated that the number of farmers markets in the U.S. increased 71 percent from 2,746 to 4,685.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Gatzke, H. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Buying Local: Perceptions of High-End Chefs in Nevada
According to the National Restaurant Association (NRA), Nevada’s restaurant industry is expected to experience the fastest growth of any state in the U.S., in terms of jobs and sales, between 2009 and 2019. This fact sheet provides an overview of the results of the survey.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Gatzke, H., and Morris, R. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada Farmers Market Customer Profiles. Cowee, M.W., Curtis, K.R., and H. Gatzke. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet, FS-09-45.
Marketing to Farmers’ Markets: Ideas for Market Vendors & Managers in Nevada. Cowee, M.W., K.R. Curtis, and H. Gatzke. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Special Publication, SP-09-10.
Consumer Preferences for Meat Attributes
Recent food industry trends have presented consumers with the opportunity to demand more from the products they purchase. In the market for food products, this means that consumers are able to purchase products that do more than serve their basic need for nutrition.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Harris, T., and Lewis, S. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Livestock Producer Interest in Local Processing
A mail survey of agricultural producers was conducted during autumn 2005 to assess producer interest in a potential livestock slaughter and/or processing facility in Northern Nevada. One hundred fifty-three surveys were returned, representing nearly 70 percent of total livestock producers in Northern Nevada.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Lewis, S., Harris, T. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Alternative Marketing Options for Nevada’s Livestock Producers. Curtis, K.R. and M.W. Cowee. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Special Publication, SP-08-02.
Cool Season Hay Attributes of Primary Importance to Nevada Horse Owners
The following paragraphs provide a brief definition/description of the rated attributes that made the top five for one or more of the horse owner groups. We hope that this information will help producers to ensure repeat customers or potentially increase their market share.
Cirelli, A., Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Riggs, W. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Native Plant Characteristics Appeal to Consumers in Nevada
In 2004, a study was conducted to examine the market in Nevada for locally produced native plants and seeds. As part of the study a survey was mailed to homeowners in the Reno, Henderson, and Las Vegas areas to determine consumer preferences for and usage of native plants and seeds.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada Consumers Willing to Pay More for “Nevada Grown” Labeled Native Plants
Appearance attributes are conveyed to the consumer through physical aspects of the product, such as color, size, and uniformity; while experience attributes are conveyed only through consumption or use of the product, such as the product's taste.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
What Value do Nevada’s Horse owners Place on Cool Season Hay Characteristics?
A hedonic pricing model is used to determine the value of individual components of a commodity, such as the value of the digestibility and nutritional content of hay. The model uses pricing data and linear regression to determine the individual values of each commodity characteristic.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Riggs, W. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Estate Taxes & Asset Transfer Mechanisms in Agriculture
Basic elements of estate planning include completing a will and keeping it updated, creating a living will and power of attorney, and setting up both a management and transfer plan for land and other operating assets.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Key Concepts & Steps in Agricultural Estate Planning
Farming and ranching, like any business, can be a risky venture. Additionally, farmland preservation has become increasingly endangered, as the market value of farmland is often higher for non-farm uses. Farmland is especially vulnerable to conversion pressures when passing from one owner to the next.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Retirement Strategies for Agribusiness Owners
Due to the nature of farm business, farm households have different savings habits and more diverse financial portfolios than typical U.S. households. In general, farm households have more personal savings than the average household and have less dependence on social security income during retirement.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Working With Gourmet Chefs: Strategies for Small Agricultural Producers
This fact sheet details the study, which sought to determine which product and supply attributes are most important to gourmet chefs, what their local purchasing patterns are, where they would like to purchase local products, and what they view as obstacles to making local purchases.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Havercamp, M. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Adding Value to Agriculture: Branding and Certification
In order for consumers to be able to identify certified products from those that are uncertified, it is essential that the certified products carry a label that states the qualifications the product has met. The increased demand for labeled products is also a result of increased disposable income.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Niche Marketing Opportunities for Nevada Agriculture
Niche marketing is supplying a good or service to a segment or target group of consumers whose needs cannot be met through the mainstream market. Essentially, the market segment has been previously ignored or is unsatisfied with the general market offering.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Value-Added Opportunities for Nevada Agriculture
Value-added agriculture can manifest itself through value-added products or through diversified product/service offerings, often called bundling. One way of adding value to a product is to take a raw product to the next level in the marketing chain (Anderson and Hall, 2000).
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Agriculture Production & Producer Needs in Nevada, 2005
This fact sheet provides an overview of a recent study of agricultural producers in Nevada which sought to determine the types of crops and livestock currently under production, the production and marketing methods in use, and the types of educational programming Nevada's agricultural producers.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Havercamp, M. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Journals
Are Homeowners Willing to Pay for "Origin-Certified" Plants in Water Conserving Residential Landscaping? Curtis, K.R. and M.W. Cowee. 2010, Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 35(1), 118-132.
Farmer’s Market Consumers: Is Local or Organic Important? Curtis, K.R., M.W. Cowee, M. Velcherean, and H. Gatzke. 2010, Journal of Food Distribution Research 41 (1): 20-24.
Direct Marketing Local Food to Chefs: Chef Preferences and Perceived Obstacles. Curtis, K. R. and M.W. Cowee. 2009, Journal of Food Distribution Research 40(2):26-36.
Special Publications
Mobile Slaughter Potential for Nevada, 2011
In 2005, a group of livestock producers requested a feasibility study to assess the potential of a producer-owned entity to slaughter, process, and market local grass-fed meats in Nevada. Specifically, the study sought to assess the economic feasibility of a mobile slaughter unit to be operated in northern Nevada.
Cowee, M. and Harris, T. 2011, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, SP-12-01
Marketing Farmers’ Markets: Ideas for Market Vendors & Managers in Nevada
In 1994, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (USDA-AMS) began tracking the number of farmers’ markets nationwide. At the start there were 1,755 farmers’ markets across the country; in 2008 there were 4,685, an increase of nearly 168 percent (USDA-AMS, 2008).
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Gatzke, H. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Alternative Marketing Options for Nevada’s Livestock Producers
Food safety concerns and the separation between producers and consumers are related, as the insecurity consumers feel regarding food safety stems from the numerous channels food products pass through before reaching the final consumer, especially in the case of imported products.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Financial Potential for Livestock Slaughter and Processing in Nevada
This publication presents a brief overview of the financial information generated from the study. This section of the study addresses financial analyses and recommendations for an optimal solution to slaughtering and processing animals.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Harris, T., and Lewis, S. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Do Producers and Horse Owners Agree on Important Characteristics of Cool Season Hays?
Lack of appropriate production contracts and the subjectivity of current pricing controlled by buyers have created a need for expanded markets and new pricing techniques. The Nevada climate and soil conditions are conducive to the production of highquality alfalfa and specialty hays, such as cool season hays.
Cirelli, A., Cowee, M., Curtis, K., and Riggs, W. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Markets for Nevada Native Plants & Seeds
The proposed cooperative would be organized to grow, process, package, and market native Nevada plants, grasses, and forbs. Native seed production and collection is still in its infancy in Nevada, and as such, the local market for native products has not been fully explored.
Cowee, M. and Curtis, K. 2007, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension