Natural Resources Research


Understanding  plant community’s responses to grazing after fire in rangeland recovery and cheatgrass management.

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Tamzen Stringham
Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Veterinary Sciences
Start Date: 7-01-2013

running models on landscape

While it is well known that expanding conifer canopies result in substantial decreases in local plant species richness and abundance and that removing or thinning pinyon and juniper often results in reversing those decreases, less is known about the broader regional effects of PJ removal on wildlife communities.

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Kevin Shoemaker
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 11-01-2016

One of the species of shrew found in the Great Basin

Providing beneficial information on demographic parameters that determine population growth or decline as well as providing detailed information on high quality habitats that are selected by ewes to enhance lamb survival.

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Kelley Stewart
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 9-01-2015

Bighorn lamb with collar

This project investigates how changing snowpacks are modulated by landscape hydrological processes through a multi-scale approach that integrates field observations, remote sensing of snow and vegetation, and physically-based modeling. 

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Adrian Harpold
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 7-01-2015

Harpold lab taking measurements

Adrian Harpold
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 6-01-2016

Sampling sediment at lake tahoe

Quantifing how PJ woodland removal alters vegetation community structure and how such shifts potentially cascade through insect and small vertebrate communities at small to large spatial scales.

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Kevin Shoemaker
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 9-01-2016

Hoary Bat clinging to Cottonwood tree

This research has the potential to make transformational improvements in our understanding of Sierra Nevada biogeochemistry while also connecting citizens to regional meadows and forests that supply water, forest products, and cattle. Improving our understanding of the amount of carbon contained in different ecosystem pools, and the rates of greenhouse gas emissions from the soil, will assist in future management and restoration of meadows.

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Benjamin Sullivan
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science
Start Date: 6-01-2016

citizen scientist helping with research